The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) has a very useful graphic to help you navigate the ins and outs of electrical outlets. This breakdown can help you better understand where these outlets should be placed within your home. For instance, did you know ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) should be installed in areas where water and electricity are in close proximity? To help keep your family safe from electrical shock, a GFCI outlet should be installed in your kitchen, bathrooms, laundry area, garages and any other area where electrical appliances may come into contact with water. GFCIs can sense unsafe electrical hazards and they automatically shut off before a serious injury or electrocution can occur. According to ESFI, a GFCI can shut off within as little as 1/40 of a second. Review this guide to help maximize your electrical safety and protection for your devices and loved ones. Here’s a breakdown of how each outlet works: Two-Pronged Receptacle: This outlet provides electricity to plugged in appliances and most were installed in buildings before 1962. Grounded Receptacle: Third prong (ground) reduces the risk of electric shock and protects equipment from electrical damage. Tamper-Resistant Receptacle (TRR): A built-in shutter system prevents objects from being inserted into the outlet, except when simultaneous, equal pressure to both slots is provided by a plug. Be aware. According to ESFI, these outlet covers don’t provide adequate protection and 100% of children ages 2 to 4 are able to remove plastic covers from this type of outlet in less than 10 seconds. Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) Receptacle: These outlets help reduce the risk of fire by interrupting power when an arc fault occurs anywhere in the circuit, including within appliances plugged into it. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates more than 50% of electrical fires that occur each year, could have been prevented by AFCIs. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) Receptacle: Prevents shock by quickly shutting off power to the circuit if the electricity flowing into the circuit differs from that returning, indicating a leakage current. These outlets should be installed in areas where water and electricity are in close proximity: your bathrooms, kitchen area, laundry and garage area. Surge Suppression Receptacle: Protects sensitive electronic equipment from transient surges. According to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), about 60-80% of surges are created within a building when large appliances, like air conditioners, are turned on and off. USB Receptacle: Provides a permanent Universal Serial Bus (USB) connection source. ESFI reports that over 10 billion electrical devices in use today are charged via USB cable. Which outlets do you have your home?

The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) has a very useful graphic to help you navigate the ins and outs of electrical outlets. This breakdown can help you better understand where these outlets should be placed within your home. For instance, did you know ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) should be installed in areas where water and electricity are in close proximity? To help keep your family safe from electrical shock, a GFCI outlet should be installed in your kitchen, bathrooms, laundry area, garages and any other area where electrical appliances may come into contact with water. GFCIs can sense unsafe electrical hazards and they automatically shut off before a serious injury or electrocution can occur. According to ESFI, a GFCI can shut off within as little as 1/40 of a second. Review this guide to help maximize your electrical safety and protection for your devices and loved ones. Here’s a breakdown of how each outlet works: Two-Pronged Receptacle: This outlet provides electricity to plugged in appliances and most were installed in buildings before 1962. Grounded Receptacle: Third prong (ground) reduces the risk of electric shock and protects equipment from electrical damage. Tamper-Resistant Receptacle (TRR): A built-in shutter system prevents objects from being inserted into the outlet, except when simultaneous, equal pressure to both slots is provided by a plug. Be aware. According to ESFI, these outlet covers don’t provide adequate protection and 100% of children ages 2 to 4 are able to remove plastic covers from this type of outlet in less than 10 seconds. Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) Receptacle: These outlets help reduce the risk of fire by interrupting power when an arc fault occurs anywhere in the circuit, including within appliances plugged into it. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates more than 50% of electrical fires that occur each year, could have been prevented by AFCIs. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) Receptacle: Prevents shock by quickly shutting off power to the circuit if the electricity flowing into the circuit differs from that returning, indicating a leakage current. These outlets should be installed in areas where water and electricity are in close proximity: your bathrooms, kitchen area, laundry and garage area. Surge Suppression Receptacle: Protects sensitive electronic equipment from transient surges. According to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), about 60-80% of surges are created within a building when large appliances, like air conditioners, are turned on and off. USB Receptacle: Provides a permanent Universal Serial Bus (USB) connection source. ESFI reports that over 10 billion electrical devices in use today are charged via USB cable. Which outlets do you have your home?
Photo via: inspiredled.com

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